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  • 16 04 2014 | Global decline had little effect in Denmark

    In 2013, Danish wind companies experienced a slight overall decline in turnover and exports. Despite this, the Danish wind industry still performed better than the highly...

    16 04 2014 Global decline had little effect in Denmark

    In 2013, Danish wind companies experienced a slight overall decline in turnover and exports. Despite this, the Danish wind industry still performed better than the highly challenged global wind market. The Danish Wind Industry Association’s recently published industry statistics show a decline in 2013, but 2014 will bring back industry growth, says the Association.

    The recently published report outlines the performance of the large group of companies in the Danish wind industry in 2013, where the global market for new wind energy installations dropped 26 pct. compared to the year before. In the report, the Danish Wind Industry Association presents a decline in Danish exports by 6.9 pct. in 2013. In the same year, the report also shows a fall in the revenue of 1.6 pct., which ended on level with previous years at approx. 80 billion DKK.

    "In a global perspective, companies in the Danish wind industry got well through 2013. When looking at the general market decline, Danish wind companies actually outperformed several other competitors, and it is noteworthy that the Danish industry almost managed to maintain its revenues, "says Jan Hylleberg, CEO, Danish Wind Industry Association.

    Exports saw a greater decline than revenue with a 7 pct. decrease from 52.3 billion DKK in 2012 to 48.7 billion DKK in 2013. In the Danish wind industry, 61 pct. of the turnover was exported against 64 pct. in the year before.

    "In addition to the large drop in the international market, the fall in exports of almost 7 pct. happened due to the extraordinary large number of activities in Denmark last year. In 2013, Danish manufacturers and companies had a larger than normal domestic focus with the commissioning of the Anholt wind farm, which meant that fewer items were exported. Therefore, the decrease is quite understandable," says Jan Hylleberg.

    Political uncertainty harms
    2013 was the first year since the 1980s that the global wind market dropped. This drop in installed capacity can in particular be attributed to declines in markets like the United States and Spain, where national political support for renewable energy almost disappeared.

    "There is no doubt that the political uncertainty we saw in several markets in 2013 has contributed greatly to the decline we experienced in Denmark. Once again, this underlines the need for long-term planning and political clarity in all markets, so that the industry can make long-term and appropriate investments," explains Jan Hylleberg.

    Market uplift in 2014
    The Danish wind industry can look forward to more work in 2014, where the global market according to the consulting company MAKE is expected to grow by approx. 40 pct. to 48,300 MW. Jan Hylleberg assesses that Danish companies have a good basis for taking part in the market growth. 

    "Towards the end of 2013, we saw a large number of companies gearing up to match the increased activity in 2014. Therefore, it is also our expectation that we in 2014 will increase our market share and increase exports and revenues in the industry, " says Jan Hylleberg and concludes:

    "2013 was not a good year for the global wind industry, but from a Danish perspective we performed satisfactorily and managed better than average. Therefore, the Danish industry is also well prepared for 2014, which we expect to be levelled with the record year of 2012."

    Read the Danish Wind Industry Annual Statistics 2014 (full report - in Danish only)

  • 05 03 2014 | Wind makes up less than 5 % of Danes’ electricity bill

    In 2013, tariffs supporting wind energy made up 4.6 pct. of Danish utility bills – a slight increase from 2 pct. in 2012. Calculations by the Danish Wind Industry...

    05 03 2014 Wind makes up less than 5 % of Danes’ electricity bill

    In 2013, tariffs supporting wind energy made up 4.6 pct. of Danish utility bills – a slight increase from 2 pct. in 2012. Calculations by the Danish Wind Industry Association show that the increase can be attributed to Denmark's largest offshore wind farm, which was completed in 2013. 

    In March 2012, the National Energy Agreement was approved with broad political support for an ambitious green restructuring of the Danish energy system toward 2020. The agreement defines the framework and targets for future Danish renewable energy expansions. With the agreement, the financial support for renewable energy continues to be paid over the Danish electricity bills through the Public Service Obligation tariff (PSO).   

    The collective PSO tariffs amounted to 5.3 billion DKK in 2013, which corresponds to 7.9 pct. of the total electricity bill for an average Danish household. 3.1 billion DKK of the PSO tariff went to wind energy, which forms the backbone of the Danish government’s green energy plan, where wind is to deliver 50 pct. of Danes’ electricity in 2020. 

    "Looking at the PSO figures from 2013, we see that average Danish households paid almost 8 pct. of their electricity bills to the transformation of the Danish energy system. Just over half of that, 4.6 pct., went to support wind energy. 4.6 pct. is a small part of the total electricity bill, however a very important part, as it contributes to the reformation and development of Denmark's energy supply," says Jan Hylleberg, CEO of the Danish Wind Industry Association.

    Support for wind increases 
    In 2012, the fraction of the PSO tariff going to wind was 44 pct. and amounted to approx. 2 billion DKK. The share paid to wind energy was 4 pct. of the electricity bill for an average Danish household in 2012. Comparing the figures from 2013 with 2012, both the total tariff costs and the wind share increased. This increase happened for a good reason and on the basis of political decisions, states Jan Hylleberg:

    "Wind is the cheapest form of renewable energy in Denmark, which is why this energy source naturally attracts more investments. Wind energy is also the cheapest way in which the goals for Denmark’s green transition are best achieved. In 2013, Danish households are to a larger extent than in 2012 contributing to the transformation of the Danish energy system through their electric bills, because we are now sourcing even more energy from wind."

    With the approval of the National Energy Agreement this trend is predicted to continue in 2014 as the expected expansion of the Danish wind capacity takes place. 

    "It was expected, that we would see an increase from 2012 to 2013 due to the commissioning of the Anholt offshore wind farm (400 MW), which was planned prior to the 2012 energy agreement entered into force. This is what we see reflected in the PSO increase between the two years," says Jan Hylleberg.

    Offshore wind turbines receive support in an average of 12-13 years, while onshore turbines are supported for an average of seven years. When the support scheme expires, turbines only receive the price rates determined by the electricity market.

    Support for other energy sources
    In addition to wind energy, other energy technologies receive support through the PSO tariff. 22.3 pct. of the PSO went to decentralized fossil power plants, while 7.7 pct. went to biogas and 8.6 pct. to biomass.

    In addition, solar and wave energy are also included in the PSO tariffs. As the support for solar energy is changing, it is expected that the support for solar power will account for an increasing proportion of future PSO payments.



    Electricity bill composition 2013

    (DKK øre/kWh)

    Electricity price: 37.51
    Grid- and system tariff: 40.18
    PSO: 17.38
    Taxes and VAT: 126.27
    Total electricity price incl. VAT: 221.34

    PSO distribution 
    PSO - wind: 10.08
    PSO - other: 7.30

    Source: Danish Wind Industry Association, Danish Energy Association and Energinet.dk



    An average Danish household
    The composition of the electricity bill means that an average Danish household with an annual consumption of 4,000 kWh paid 695 DKK through the PSO in 2013 – out of which support to wind energy accounted for 403 DKK. 


    About the PSO tariff
    PSO stands for "Public Service Obligation", and is a tariff that individual consumers and businesses pay through their electricity bills. It is through the PSO tariff that the production of renewable energy, operation of decentralized power plants and research in clean energy technologies are supported.

    Energinet.dk sets the PSO tariff each quarter. The PSO tariff builds on the principles that when the price of electricity is high, renewable energy requires a smaller PSO contribution to be competitive. A higher PSO tariff is temporarily needed when electricity prices fall in order for green energy to remain profitable.

  • 17 10 2013 | Denmark is 'Gift to the Earth'

    On Monday the 21st of October, Denmark, global leader on climate and energy, receives WWF’s 'Gift to the Earth' award in recognition of the world’s most...

    17 10 2013 Denmark is 'Gift to the Earth'

    On Monday the 21st of October, Denmark, global leader on climate and energy, receives WWF’s 'Gift to the Earth' award in recognition of the world’s most ambitious climate and energy targets.

    In recognition of the Danish environmental accomplishments the WWF presents Denmark with the 'Gift to the Earth' award. Other than international leadership in e.g. wind power, the award is based on Denmark’s ability to create long term climate and renewable energy targets and to streamline power production leading to very high levels of energy efficiency. Factors which have formed at cleantech sector with substantial impact on the Danish economy.

    Since the 1970’s oil crisis a lot of work has been put into green growth in Denmark. Public resistance to nuclear power contributed to nourish the interest for renewable energy solutions, and in 1985 the Danish Parliament formally decided that no nuclear power stations should be built in Denmark. Instead Denmark has become the absolute world champion on one key renewable technology – wind power

    A role model
    As late as this September, a new report from the U.N. Climate Panel concluded that we need to act fast to protect the climate. With sea levels rising, droughts, and extreme weather, rising temperatures have already had a serious impact on both humans and on the planet.

    “Denmark illustrates that it is possible to develop a sustainable society and at the same secure economic growth and welfare. This is the kind of lighthouses we need at a global level to inspire other countries. As a large international environmental organization WWF would like to applaud Denmark for its global leadership,“ says Jim Leape, International General Secretary at WWF.

    'Gift to the Earth' will be presented to the Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt on Monday the 21st of October at the conference Global Green Growth Forum in Copenhagen at 12:30 PM.

     
     
    If you’d like to know more
     
    Learn more about 'Gift to the Earth' and the background for the Danish recognition here
     
    You can also visit WWF here
     
     
    Did you know…
    • Wind power supplied 30 pct. of the Danish electricity consumption in 2012? This compares with 3 pct. globally, 7pct. in the EU, and 8 pct. in Germany
    • Renewable energy covered 22.9 pct. of total energy consumption in 2012, and 41.7 pct. of the Danish electricity consumption?
    • It is a political goal in Denmark that power and heat supply will be based on 100 pct. renewable energy by 2035?
  • 25 04 2013 | EWEA Offshore 2015 in Copenhagen

    The world’s largest wind energy network, the European Wind Energy Association, will hold its 2015 offshore wind conference and exhibition in Copenhagen. Motivating...

    25 04 2013 EWEA Offshore 2015 in Copenhagen

    The world’s largest wind energy network, the European Wind Energy Association, will hold its 2015 offshore wind conference and exhibition in Copenhagen. Motivating factors for selecting Copenhagen was a strong and unified partnership behind the Danish bid as well as Denmark’s pioneering position within offshore wind.

    Copenhagen has been chosen as host city for the EWEA Offshore 2015 ahead of competing candidate cities such as Stockholm, Amsterdam and Paris. EWEA Offshore takes place every second year and focuses exclusively on the offshore wind market and associated services and products.
     
    “It is fantastic news for Denmark and the Danish wind industry that EWEA Offshore will be hosted in Denmark in 2015. A lot of hard work and diligence has been invested in making this happen. I owe great thanks to our collaborative partners at State of Green, Copenhagen Municipality, Wonderful Copenhagen and Bella Center. Without their cooperation, we could not have brought EWEA Offshore to Copenhagen again”, says Jan Hylleberg, CEO at the Danish Wind Industry Association.
     
    A Nexus for Wind
    The EWEA 2015 offshore event will hold an extensive number of activities for conference delegates and visitors interested, or active in the offshore wind sector, to source the latest technologies, services and advice from key experts in the sector.
     
    “Denmark is a nexus for offshore wind energy and companies located here are able to deliver end-to-end solutions throughout the entire offshore wind power value chain. As the global wind power hub, we hope to continue the current trend at EWEA Offshore events by setting yet another visitors record here in Copenhagen in 2015”, says Finn Mortensen, Executive Director at State of Green.
     
    EWEA 2015 takes place from 1-3 December 2015 at Bella Center in Copenhagen.
  • 04 04 2013 | EWEA 2012 awarded “Congress of the year” in Copenhagen 2012

    EWEA 2012 has received the “Congress of the year” award in the category for congresses with more than 1.000 participants. The Danish Wind Industry Association...

    04 04 2013 EWEA 2012 awarded “Congress of the year” in Copenhagen 2012

    EWEA 2012 has received the “Congress of the year” award in the category for congresses with more than 1.000 participants. The Danish Wind Industry Association accepted the award on behalf of all the partners. In April last year EWEA 2012 drew almost 11,000 visitors to Copenhagen, making it the largest private conference ever. DWIA and the other partners of the conference are excited and proud of the recognition.

    It is Wonderful Copenhagen and the City of Copenhagen that has nominated and selected the EWEA 2012 Annual Event, which DWIA helped to organize and bring to Copenhagen.

    "It is a great honor to win this award and we are very pleased with the recognition that the City of Copenhagen and Wonderful Copenhagen has given us and the whole industry" says Jan Hylleberg, CEO of the Danish Wind Industry Association.

    EWEA 2012 won in the category 'Congresses with more than 1,000 participants' and a total of 15 conferences in 2012 lived up to this criterion, with two others nominated. With approx. 11,000 Danish and International participants EWEA 2012 is the largest private conference in Copenhagen’s history, and had a turnover in Copenhagen of approx. 140 million DKK (18.5 million Euros).

    The motivation for the award highlights the cooperation between EWEA and a large number of local partners, including the city and citizens of Copenhagen e.g. the successful public outreach program at Ophelia Beach, Middelgrund tours etc. and also the strong commitment from the official Denmark with attendance of the Crown Prince, Prime Minister, Minister of Climate and Energy, Minister of Business and Growth, Minister of Trade and Investment and The Lord Mayor of Copenhagen.

    Coordinated efforts across organizations and borders
    EWEA 2012 was a strong team effort and could only be done with the great support the project received from many different partners including among others: EWEA, City of Copenhagen, Wonderful Copenhagen, Capital Region, State of Green, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Jutland Wind Regions and Municipalities, sponsors and member companies.

    “The many partners in the project show that we in Denmark have the ability to lift this kind of events together. And it's no secret that the Danish Wind Industry Association in the light of the 2012 success hopes to attract new European wind events to Denmark and we are in no doubt that we will be able to handle them successfully,” says Jan Hylleberg, CEO of the Danish Wind Industry Association.

    The EWEA Annual Event is an annual congress that offers both an exhibition and a conference. It is owned by The European Wind Energy Association and was in 2012 held in Copenhagen.

    “EWEA 2012 in Copenhagen is the largest EWEA – Annual Event ever held with approx. 11.000 participants.”

  • 31 01 2013 | Wind energy passes 30%

    By the end of 2012 wind energy covered more than 30% of Denmark's electricity consumption. Denmark is thus still well on its way toward the target of 50% wind energy...

    31 01 2013 Wind energy passes 30%

    By the end of 2012 wind energy covered more than 30% of Denmark's electricity consumption. Denmark is thus still well on its way toward the target of 50% wind energy in 2020, and remains the country in the world that has the highest share of wind energy in the electricity system.

    The share of 30% wind energy in the electricity consumption is an increase of approx. 2 percentage points compared to 2011. The increase is based on some 170 MW of new capacity built on land and more than 50 MW at sea. At sea, it comes from wind turbines connected to the Anholt Offshore Wind Farm and onshore some 20% comes from Kalundborg Municipality, where 36 MW were installed last year. The new figures are from the Danish Energy Agency wind register.

    "An increase of 2 percentage points may not sound as much, but it is in line with what we expect to reach the official target of 50% in 2020. We will see a slightly larger jump in 2013, when Anholt completed and there will again be some jumps when we connect the next big wind farms and near-shore turbines in 2017-2020,"says chief economist at the Danish Wind Industry Association, Sune Strøm.

    Construction at sea speeds up towards 2020
    The number of new turbines at sea will increase significantly in the years up to 2020.  Anholt Offshore Wind Farm will be completed at the end of 2013 and by the time the park's 400 MW will provide 4% of the Danish electricity consumption. In addition, the planning process has started for Horns Rev III of 400 MW, Krieger's Flak of 600 MW and the near-shore turbines which will have a combined capacity of 500 MW, of which 50 MW will be test turbines.

  • 05 12 2012 | A new survey shows that neighbours of wind turbines only experience few...

    A new Danish nationwide survey from ‘Viden Om Vind’ (Knowledge about Wind) shows that four out of five neighbours to wind turbines do not experience any...

    05 12 2012 A new survey shows that neighbours of wind turbines only experience few annoyances from turbines in their neighbourhood.

    A new Danish nationwide survey from ‘Viden Om Vind’ (Knowledge about Wind) shows that four out of five neighbours to wind turbines do not experience any drawbacks from being a neighbour. For the great majority, there were no drawbacks living close to wind turbines, but the survey also showed that noise can disturb some neighbours.

    The survey is based on interviews with neighbours located within a radius of two kilometres (1.25 miles) from all new wind turbine projects in Denmark, provided the wind turbine was at least 120 meters (394 feet) tall, and had been in operation minimum a year. In all, interviews were completed with 1,278 neighbours living close to a total of 125 wind turbines spread across 30 projects, where the newest project was placed into service in July 2011. The survey showed that 4 % of neighbours feel that they are disturbed by wind turbine noise “to a major extent,” and another 5 % are “moderately” disturbed. The survey also showed that after one year of having a wind turbine as a neighbour, 23 % were more positive than they were before the installation. The survey has been conducted by the independent research company Jysk Analyse.

    “It is good that this survey has been done, as we know how the neighbours of wind turbines perceive wind turbines on an everyday basis. We are pleased to see that more than 80 % of respondents were not at all disturbed by wind turbines, but we would like to see a higher figure. As with all other necessary infrastructure, wind turbines cause some noise, which is apparent in the survey. I am pleased that, with the new stricter noise regulations which took effect on January 1st, 2012, we have hopefully mitigated this inconvenience. A new survey could be made in the future, so as to measure the effectiveness of these new regulations.” said Jan Hylleberg, CEO of Vindmølleindustrien (The Danish Wind Industry Association).

    “It is good to see that, over time, neighbours become accustomed to wind turbines placed in their local area. Where every fourth neighbour has a more positive outlook after a year, we can see that the negative stories, so often attributed to wind turbines, have been strongly over dramatized. At the same time, this survey gives us a clear picture of how the neighbourliness is perceived in reality. This research gives us concrete knowledge that helps to underline that the many negative reports emerging from both large and small media outlets are not, to put it mildly, representative of the actual experience,” said Asbjørn Bjerre, CEO of Danmarks Vindmølleforening (The Danish Wind Turbine Owner’s Association).

    Noise disturbance accommodated
    The survey also showed that, for by far the majority of neighbours, noise is the only actual inconvenience. For the Danish Wind Industry Association as for the Danish Wind Turbine Owner’s Association there is agreement that the current sensible wind turbine planning process focus on this challenge as only very few people live close to new wind turbines.

    “On an annual basis, these 125 wind turbines deliver clean and reliable electricity to roughly 200,000 households. This is a very attractive result for future wind turbine planning in Denmark, given the fortunate consideration that relatively few people experience any inconveniences,” said Asbjørn Bjerre.

    At both associations the expectation is that the new noise regulation that came into effect January 1st 2012 will reduce the nuisance from noise, as new wind turbines will have to comply with noise regulations which are stricter than those applying to wind turbines in this survey.

    You will find the survey here (in Danish only)(.pdf)

  • 19 09 2012 | DWIA launches map of the Danish wind industry

    With the launch of a new interactive map, It has become easier for interested parties home and abroad, to get an overview of the Danish wind industry. It is now...

    19 09 2012 DWIA launches map of the Danish wind industry

    With the launch of a new interactive map, It has become easier for interested parties home and abroad, to get an overview of the Danish wind industry.

    It is now possible to see the geographical distribution of wind companies in Denmark, and find the company or companies, that are relevant to you.

    With the map you can search for addresses, products and company names, and the different color codes makes it easy to distinguish between product categories. This way the map opens up the DWIA member directory, and makes it accessible for everyone.

    Overview with a single click
    It is possible to zoom in and see companies and their product categories in specific areas of Denmark. If one wishes for example, to get an overview of companies within the category of installation and logistics in South Jutland, it is possible, with a single click of a button, to display the distribution of wind companies that offer these services.

    “The interactive member map is a service which makes it faster, to find the information you seek. We hope, that potential clients and external partners will benefit from the options the map gives in creating overview and insight in the Danish wind industry,” says Dorte Burin Møller, Chief consultant at The Danish Wind Industry Association.

    Try out the map here

  • 04 04 2012 | EWEA 2012 first ever event to be labelled WindMade™

    EWEA 2012 Conference & Exhibition in Copenhagen is the first event ever to be labelled by WindMade. The total electricity consumed at the event will be procured...

    04 04 2012 EWEA 2012 first ever event to be labelled WindMade™

    EWEA 2012 Conference & Exhibition in Copenhagen is the first event ever to be labelled by WindMade. The total electricity consumed at the event will be procured exclusively by wind power.
     
    "EWEA is proud to be the organiser of the world's first WindMade event - run 100% on wind power," said Christian Kjaer, EWEA's CEO. "EWEA strives to make its events sustainable, and to promote wind energy not only through political lobbying but also by making direct use of wind power. EWEA is convinced that WindMade will drive investment into this technology, and we encourage other organsiations and events to follow our lead in becoming WindMade." 
     
    For an event to be WindMade labelled, it needs to procure 100% of its electricity footprint from renewable power. For EWEA2012, this includes the six month long event preparations at the EWEA offices, the power usage at the Bella Center and electricity used at the social events (receptions and conference dinner).
     
    "Many conference organisers are already making efforts to 'green' their events, and WindMade is pleased to present them with a tool for having their commitment to renewable power certified by a credible label," said Henrik Kuffner, WindMade's CEO.
     
    The WindMade events standard was developed following strong demand from conference organisers wishing to differentiate their events by showing their commitment to wind power. Under the WindMade Technical Standard, any kind of event could be labelled - from a theatre production to a trade fair, from a big sports event to a small conference.
     
    Since the WindMade program only addresses electricity use, conference organisers are also encouraged to offset all other carbon emissions such as transport, heating and others.
     
    For more information on the WindMade initiative or the Events Label, see www.windmade.org or contact info@windmade.org.

  • 13 12 2011 | Danish wind turbines to deliver electricity for the Danish EU Presidency in...

    The Danish Wind Industry Association is sponsoring certificates for 400 MW from danish wind turbines, equalling the presidency’s overall electricity consumption....

    13 12 2011 Danish wind turbines to deliver electricity for the Danish EU Presidency in 2012

    The Danish Wind Industry Association is sponsoring certificates for 400 MW from danish wind turbines, equalling the presidency’s overall electricity consumption.

    In the first half of 2012, Denmark will host the EU Presidency and as a leading green nation, the Danish presidency will have a large focus on sustainability.

    Therefore, the Danish Wind Industry Association (DWIA) is happy to be delivering certificates for green electricity from Danish wind turbines to the Danish EU Presidency. The sponsorship entails that DWIA reserves certificates of origin from Danish Wind turbines, equalling the presidency’s overall electricity consumption of 400 MW.

    “We are very happy to be part of making the Danish EU Presidency greener. Denmark is a green pioneer country, especially regarding wind energy and with this sponsorship, we make sure that this fact is not unnoticed,” says Jakob Lau Holst, COO at DWIA.

    EU politicians to look at wind turbines
    During the EU Presidency, DWIA is also sponsoring five boat trips to Middelgrunden offhore wind farm just outside Copenhagen. Here delegates, journalists and ministres will be able to see the turbines at close range, and witness how wind turbines can be placed close to a modern city.

    ”At several occations, we have had politicians and other foreign guests out to see Middelgrunden offshore wind farm. On a two-hour boat trip you can tell and show the entire history of Danish energy – from waste incineration and district heating to wind energy. It is my experience that foreign guests head home with tangible experience, which motivates them to make decisions about the change to green energy,” says Jakob Lau Holst.

    Details on certificates
    The certificates will be delivered in cooperation with Vindenergi Danmark, whom as an independent electric company, manage 2,955 wind turbines in Denmark with an annual outcome of 3,400 MW. Vindenergi Danmark is keeping accounts with the certificates of origin and the accounts are assignet to the companies’ external accountancy. All wind turbines to deliver electricity for the EU Presidency are less than two years old.

  • 12 10 2011 | Danish government: “50 percent of power consumption from wind power in 2020”

    The new Danish centre-left coalition government has increased targets on wind capacity. Wind power is set to represent 50 percent of the total power consumption in Denmark...

    12 10 2011 Danish government: “50 percent of power consumption from wind power in 2020”

    The new Danish centre-left coalition government has increased targets on wind capacity. Wind power is set to represent 50 percent of the total power consumption in Denmark in 2020.

    The new Danish government just recently released its targets on renewable energy and CO2 emissions. The new disposition increases the previous CO2 reduction target from 30 to 40 percent, measured relative to 1990.

    “A green and more sustainable world does not evolve by itself,” says Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt at the Global Green Growth Forum in Copenhagen on the 11th of October.

    As a part of the increased ambitions on CO2 emissions, wind power is targeted to represent 50 percent of the total power consumption in Denmark in 2020. The major role of wind power should be seen as a part of the government’s plan to phase out fossil fuels by 2050.

    The ambitious targets place Denmark in pole position on renewables among the developed countries.

  • 04 04 2011 | New all time high record in exports

    Backed by rising exports, the Danish wind energy sector beat expectations to register healthy growth in 2010, the Danish Wind Industry Association announced in connection...

    04 04 2011 New all time high record in exports

    Backed by rising exports, the Danish wind energy sector beat expectations to register healthy growth in 2010, the Danish Wind Industry Association announced in connection with the annual meeting on March 30th.

    Sectoral revenues rose by 8.3 percent in 2010, corresponding to 55.3 billion Danish kroner (10.44 billion U.S. dollars), up from 51.1 billion Danish kroner (9.64 billion dollars) in 2009.

    Meanwhile, the sector's exports rose 11 percent, earning 46.2 billion Danish kroner (8.72 billion dollars) in 2010, up from 41.7 billion Danish kroner (7.87 billion dollars) the previous year, indicating that overall sectoral growth is strongly-pegged to export strategies.

    "Generally the wind industry in Denmark had a surprisingly good year in 2010. We expected the financial crisis also to affect the industry in 2010 as it did in 2009. However, it seems that especially Vestas Wind Systems and Siemens Wind Power had a really good 2010" says Jan Hylleberg, CEO, DWIA

    The figures represent a record, with the wind-industry accounting for 8.5 percent of Denmark's total exports in 2010. European markets were the primary destination, but non-European markets were also important buyers.

    Barring negative growth in 2003 and 2009, the Danish wind sector has grown by an annual average of 16 percent between 2000 and 2010.

    It is predicted that 2011 will have a "moderate growth" in revenue and exports for Danish wind energy companies.

    - Turnover: National turnover rose to 55.3 billion DKK in 2010 corresponding to 8.3 percent.

    - Turnover: Global sales (incl. Denmark) rose by 8.1 percent to 98.8 billion DKK.

    - Export: Exports in 2010 rose to 46.2 billion DKK or by 11 percent.

    - Export: Exports from the industry remained on 8.5 percent of the total Danish exports.

    - Employment: Employment rose to 25.000, meaning that the sector grew 1.2 percent i 2010.

  • 05 01 2011 | Denmark - Wind Power Hub

    The Danish wind industry is unique in many ways. A proud history of being first mover in both onshore and offshore wind energy has made us front runner in innovative wind...

    05 01 2011 Denmark - Wind Power Hub

    The Danish wind industry is unique in many ways. A proud history of being first mover in both onshore and offshore wind energy has made us front runner in innovative wind solutions that are in demand all over the world. These solutions have created the backbone in the energy system, with almost 25% of the electricity supply consisting of wind energy. A penetration rate unmatched by any other country.

    However, the Danish wind power hub has even greater ambitions for the future and aims to draw on the qualities in the unique supply chain to fulfill them. Invest in Denmark and the Danish Wind Industry Association (DWIA) have published a brochure “Denmark – Wind Power Hub” focusing on the wind industry and some of the challenges that lie ahead on the road to 50% wind energy in the energy system by 2020.

    “Denmark – Wind Power Hub” introduces some of the key competencies in the wind industry and the activities of our many members to make sure we will remain global leader in wind energy as well as function as incubator for new innovative system solutions that aim to cut cost of energy.

    The brochure portrays developments in the supply chain with many key competencies clustered within a 200 km radius. It also tells the story of how wind energy is integrated into the energy system and the necessary steps to reach 50%.

    Danish companies have a 90% market share offshore and the brochure highlights some of the close networks between educational institutions and companies in the pursuit of finding tomorrows talents in the industry. “Denmark – Wind Power Hub” also lists the Danish test and demonstration facilities necessary to deliver tomorrow’s technological solutions.

    DWIA welcomes new members to our extensive network.

    Enjoy the read!
    Read the brochure here

  • 03 12 2010 | New offshore strategy from partnership Megavind

    In May 2006, the Danish Government presented a report on promoting environmentally effective technology and established a number of innovative partnerships. The...

    03 12 2010 New offshore strategy from partnership Megavind

    In May 2006, the Danish Government presented a report on promoting environmentally effective technology and established a number of innovative partnerships. The partnerships intend to strengthen public-private cooperation between the state, industry, universities and venture capital to accelerate innovation for a number of green technologies. The partnership for wind energy is called Megavind.

    Megavind’s vision is to maintain Denmark as a globally leading hub in wind power. The following partners represent the sector:

    • Vestas Wind Systems A/S

    • Siemens Wind Power A/S

    • DONG Energy

    • Grontmij I Carl Bro

    • The Technical University of Denmark

    • Risø DTU - National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy

    • Aalborg University

    • Energinet.dk (observer)

    • Danish Energy Agency (observer)

    Megavind’s strategy for offshore wind describes the offshore challenges and suggests research, development and demonstration (RD&D) priorities to enable offshore wind power become to competitive with other energy technologies. The strategy lists key recommendations as well as key thematic priorities and for each of these a number of RD&D priorities. Under each thematic priority references are made to the European Strategic Energy Technology plan (SET-plan), which prioritises offshore wind RD&D in Europe.

    The strategy content and recommendations are based on inputs from a long list of Da-nish offshore players both from industry and research organisations.

    The Danish Wind Industry Association functions as secretariat for Megavind and Risø DTU has co-authored the strategy.

    Read the full report in English here (pdf)

  • 23 06 2010 | DONG Energy to build Anholt Offshore Wind Farm

    The Danish Energy Agency has awarded DONG Energy the concession to build the next major offshore wind farm in Denmark off the Danish island of Anholt in the Kattegat. The...

    23 06 2010 DONG Energy to build Anholt Offshore Wind Farm

    The Danish Energy Agency has awarded DONG Energy the concession to build the next major offshore wind farm in Denmark off the Danish island of Anholt in the Kattegat. The wind farm will have a capacity of 400MW and thus it will be the largest wind farm in Denmark.

    The construction of the wind farm will represent a total investment of approximately DKK 10 billion ($1.65bn).

     The wind farm is expected to be commissioned in 2013. When fully operational, it will provide clean energy for approximately 400,000 households, or four per cent of Denmark's power consumption.

    'Building Anholt offshore wind farm is an important milestone in the expansion of green energy production in Denmark. DONG Energy is therefore happy to build Denmark’s next large wind farm,' said Anders Eldrup, CEO of DONG Energy, and added:

    'Building Anholt offshore wind farm will bring DONG Energy a major step closer towards the vision of supplying energy without CO2.'

    Siemens Wind Power will supply the wind turbines with a capacity of 3.6MW and a rotor diameter of 120mt to the Anholt wind farm. The wind turbines will be produced at Siemens Wind Power’s plant in Brande in Denmark and installed 20km off the northeastern coast of the Jutland peninsula.

    Siemens Energy chief executive Wolfgang Dehen said: "The new order for the Anholt offshore wind farm further strengthens our position as the global leader in offshore wind power.”

    The scope of supply for Siemens Wind Power includes manufacturing, installation and commissioning of the wind turbines. The company will also provide a service and maintenance agreement for the first five years, with an option of selected services during the second five years.

  • 20 05 2010 | Mark the date: Global Wind Day - 15 June 2010

    15 June is Global Wind Day - In 2010 the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA) and the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) are organising wind events around the world for...

    20 05 2010 Mark the date: Global Wind Day - 15 June 2010

    15 June is Global Wind Day - In 2010 the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA) and the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) are organising wind events around the world for both the public and the media to come and find out more about wind energy. Already some 38 organisations have signed up to take part, with others sure to join them. 

    “Imagine being able to harness the power of nature in a sustainable way to create abundant clean energy, tackle  climate change, create jobs and end our dangerous dependence on polluting fossil fuels”, said Steve Sawyer, Secretary General of  GWEC. “It’s not a dream, it’s wind energy – and it definitely deserves a special day.”  

    Last year over 300 Global Wind Day events were held in 35 countries from China to the Czech Republic to Canada.  

    “2010 will be even bigger,” said Christian Kjaer, Chief Executive of EWEA. “Wind Day has grown in popularity since its launch in 2007 because wind power itself is breaking all records. In Europe more wind power was installed in the last two years than any other energy-generating technology. There is spectacular growth in China, the US and elsewhere. It's a global success story."  

    “Global Wind Day is a fantastic opportunity for people to participate in wind energy events and ask all the questions they may have about it,” added Kjaer. “People will be able to see for themselves how it works and what the benefits are.”

    EWEA will put up a 29 metre turbine blade in the middle of the Schuman roundabout next to the European Commission and European Council in the heart of the European quarter of Brussels, to promote its message and new campaign: “Give Europe a breath of fresh air”.

    From wind farm open days and conferences, to exhibitions, information days, sporting contests and photo contests, there will be something for everyone in most corners of the globe.

    For example, in the spectacular setting of the Villa Borghese in central Rome there will be conferences and sporting events for over two weeks. In Poland, inflatable wind turbines eight metres high will be placed in front of government offices around the country. In Estonia, a ‘wind turbines in the future’ design contest will award the winner the chance to drive a Toyota Prius for one month. In Argentina, Sweden and the Netherlands there will be photo competitions.

    In Brussels, on Monday, 14 June there will be a press conference (on the day before Global Wind Day) at the foot of the blade on Schuman roundabout (information about time, subject and speakers will be sent separately in due course.)

    Read more
    www.globalwindday.org

  • 14 04 2010 | Danish Wind Industry Maintains High Export Figures In 2009 Despite Financial...

    With an aggregated export of 41.7 billion kr. (exceeding 5.6 billion euro) in 2009 the Danish wind industry maintained the high export figures from record breaking 2008...

    14 04 2010 Danish Wind Industry Maintains High Export Figures In 2009 Despite Financial Crisis

    With an aggregated export of 41.7 billion kr. (exceeding 5.6 billion euro) in 2009 the Danish wind industry maintained the high export figures from record breaking 2008 despite the financial crisis. The wind industry exports account for 8.5 per cent of total Danish exports in 2009 compared to 7.2 per cent in 2008.       

    “We have maintained the high export figures from the record breaking 2008. Today, the Danish export of wind power technology accounts for 8.5 per cent of the total Danish exports as compared to 7.2 per cent in 2008. The industry has felt the financial crisis because the markets were depressed resulting in lower employment rates,” says Jan Hylleberg, CEO of The Danish Wind Industry Association and continues:

    “Looking ahead the industry expects employment rates to increase by 8 per cent in 2010 to a total of approximately 26.700 employees. Thereby half of the workplaces lost in 2009 will be recreated, and it is most gratifying that the companies expect to reemploy as many people.”

    The wind industry expects the Danish nearby markets to grow from 35 GW at present to a minimum of 117 GW by 2020 equivalent to a growth by more than 10 per cent a year.

    “The Danish companies are well prepared to turn the great potential on the nearby markets in to good account. The potential in northern Europe both onshore as offshore is great and commercially unexploited. If we come to a decision in Denmark as to the national 2020 extension plan, the technology development taking place among Danish companies will be strengthened. Denmark has always been a front runner regarding next generation turbines, components, and grid. A decision to develop the energy system enabling us to integrate 50 per cent wind power by 2020 will drive the technology development forward,” says Jan Hylleberg.

    Today, wind power accounts for approximately 20 per cent of the Danish electricity supply. The Danish Wind Industry Association has shown how 50 per cent of the electricity can be supplied by wind power by 2020.     

    “A national target to realize 50 per cent wind power by 2020 will, apart from a certain market potential, pave the way for technology development among the Danish companies. The technology development will take place among manufacturers, suppliers, and utility companies and also provide an interesting possibility to exhibit Danish competencies to the benefit of the Danish industry, exports, and employment,” concludes Jan Hylleberg.

    For more information please contact:
    CEO Mr. Jan Hylleberg, +45 3373 0330
    Head of Press Mr. Rune Birk Nielsen, rbn@windpower.org, +45 3373 0339/ +45 6133 3653

    Read the Danish Wind Industry Annual Statistics 2010 here

  • 22 03 2010 | American Oil Lobby Has Commissioned CEPOS Report on Wind Power

    In a press release from the Institute for Energy Research (IER) which is funded by the American oil and coal lobby, IER admits that it has commissioned the report on...

    22 03 2010 American Oil Lobby Has Commissioned CEPOS Report on Wind Power

    In a press release from the Institute for Energy Research (IER) which is funded by the American oil and coal lobby, IER admits that it has commissioned the report on Danish wind power from CEPOS.

    This confession leads the Danish Wind Industry Association to ask for an explanation in an open letter to the chairman of CEPOS, Bernt Johan Collet.

    The Danish think tank CEPOS published the controversial report last September and went “on tour” with the report in the US. The report is highly critical of the Danish model on wind power and indicates that the Danish wind turbine industry model is ineffective.

    The validity of these conclusions has been contested by numerous experts challenging not only the figures but also the method by which these figures were drawn up.

    ”We are not to judge on CEPOS’ professional standards or the quality of their reports. However, we think it is open to criticism that CEPOS is touring one of the wind industry’s most important markets with misleading and undocumented messages on Danish wind power,” says Jan Hylleberg, Managing Director, Danish Wind Industry Association.

    Recently, a group of fourteen independent researchers, scientists, and analytics joined in extensive criticism of the CEPOS report.

    ”You need to ask yourself what CEPOS’ motive is? Why are they compromising Danish companies’ business opportunities in the US?” underlines Jan Hylleberg.

    The Danish Wind Industry Association has just sent a letter to CEPOS’ chairman, Bernt Johan Collet, requesting a response to the massive critique of CEPOS touring the US.

    ”I think it is quite fair to ask why CEPOS has acted this way. Is it owed to a general opposition to the Danish wind industry? Or has CEPOS willingly been the American oil lobby’s mouthpiece?” Jan Hylleberg asks.

    In a response to the Danish Parliament, the Danish Minister for Climate and Energy, Lykke Friis, recently stated her opinion that “CEPOS’ report “Wind Energy - The Case of Denmark” gives a distorted picture of wind power.”

    IER on Wikipedia
    IER’ press release on the CEPOS report
    Expert Group Report: Danish Wind Power Export and Cost (pdf)

  • 19 03 2010 | Oil Industry Behind Critical Wind Energy Report

    Conservative think tank admits that report critical of Denmark’s wind power industry was commissioned by US think tank A controversial report critical of the wind...

    19 03 2010 Oil Industry Behind Critical Wind Energy Report

    Conservative think tank admits that report critical of Denmark’s wind power industry was commissioned by US think tank A controversial report critical of the wind energy industry from conservative think tank CEPOS was commissioned and paid for by an American think tank.

    A controversial report critical of the wind energy industry from conservative think tank CEPOS was commissioned and paid for by an American think tank with close ties to the coal and oil industries, according to trade journal Ingeniøren.

    The report, which was published last September and concluded that Danish wind energy figures were misleading, was taken by CEPOS members to the US media in the months leading up to the COP15 climate summit in Copenhagen. The message behind the report indicated that the Danish wind turbine industry model was not effective.

    Numerous experts have since strongly criticised the report’s conclusions, challenging many of the figures and the means in which those figures were obtained.

    But now it appears that the report was indirectly commissioned and paid for by the American coal and oil lobby.

    A press release from the Institute for Energy Research (IPR) indicated that it had commissioned the report from CEPOS.

    IPR reportedly receives funding from the American oil and coal lobby. The think tank has posted a summary of the CEPOS report on its website which includes the claims that ‘in 2006 scarcely 5 percent of the nation’s electricity demand was met by wind. And over the past five years, the average is less than 10 percent — despite Denmark having carpeted its land with [wind turbines]’.

    CEPOS CEO Martin Ågerup admitted to Ingeniøren that the report was both commissioned and paid for by IPR. But he said he was not aware of IPR receiving funding from the coal and oil industry.

    ‘I don’t know who supports them. That doesn’t interest me. They contacted me and so we did the report,’ Ågerup said.

    Ågerup admitted, however, that during his company’s tour of the US last autumn, he and one of the report’s authors, Hugh Sharman, were made aware of the relationship between IPR and the American coal and oil industries.

    ‘I was told that IPR was supported by coal and oil interests, but I don’t know the specific sponsors,’ he said. But then it’s common for people to have sponsors for a project – just as we have also had, for example, for reports dealing with integration and the school system.’

    ‘The only condition we impose is that we are allowed to be fully independent in our conclusions and the assessments we make,’ said Ågerup. ‘And IPR has fully lived up to that condition.’

    Source: The Copenhagen Post

  • 09 03 2010 | Progress Already!

    By Ken Dragoon In February, Danish energy industries invited some dozen Americans, including Federal Energy Commissioner Mark Spitzer, to Denmark to learn about Danish...

    09 03 2010 Progress Already!

    By Ken Dragoon

    In February, Danish energy industries invited some dozen Americans, including Federal Energy Commissioner Mark Spitzer, to Denmark to learn about Danish efforts to reduce dependence on fossil fuels.  Their purpose was to encourage the spread of the Danish example to the United States.  To be sure, changing anything in our current political climate is a daunting task.  Nevertheless, when the US gets serious about energy security and reducing emissions, the future will no doubt look a lot like Denmark.

    Denmark’s dedication to purpose was born out of the 1974 oil crisis.  Back then, more than 95% of Danish energy came from petroleum.  The economic effects of the oil crisis were devastating.  Cars were banned entirely from streets on Sundays.  Leaders across the political spectrum agreed to end dependence on oil.  Mass popular opposition led to abandoning any nuclear programs in 1985 and the emergence of policies to rely entirely on renewable energy.

    Today, wind power supplies more than 20% of the electric energy consumed in Denmark.  In ten years, it will be 50%.  They won’t stop there.  Indeed, the government’s goal is a carbon-free power grid, with most of the energy coming from wind power.  Denmark is leveraging its green power grid by adopting electric vehicles as the main mode of personal motorized transportation (40% of the population commutes by bicycle).  Efficiency is key too—so-called power plant “waste heat” is captured to provide hot water and space heat through district heating systems that already serve 60% of all buildings.

    Accommodating the variability and uncertainty of the growing reliance on wind power is a central focus.  Risø National Research Center Director Henrik Bindslev explained that instead of energy supply responding to demand, demand will respond to supply in the Danish grid.  When the wind comes up, excess energy can be stored as hot water for the district heating systems and in electric vehicle batteries.  When the wind dies off, batteries can give back some of the energy to the grid.  The island of Bornholm will soon be the first system served entirely by renewable energy and virtually isolated from the main power grid.

    When the wind doesn’t blow for longer periods, batteries won’t be enough.  The Danes are burning wood chips and other waste bio matter in their power plants.  Rescuing straw from being burned or left to rot on farmers’ fields, the Danes invented a process to turn straw into alcohol for fueling cars, molasses to feed cattle, and lignin pellets to fuel the big power plants that used to burn coal.

    Little Denmark, with a population hardly more than Oregon’s is not only replacing all its fossil resources with renewable energy, it is adding jobs by exporting technologies such as the straw-to-alcohol plant. From 1990 to 2007, Denmark’s GDP increased 40% while its weather-adjusted carbon emissions decreased 14%.  This is our future once we find the political will to follow it.  I can hardly wait.

  • 28 01 2010 | Wind power capacity on the rise

    After a period of stalemate, the Danish Energy Agency (DEA), has announced that the Danish wind power industry is beginning to get back into gear. Although Denmark is...

    28 01 2010 Wind power capacity on the rise

    After a period of stalemate, the Danish Energy Agency (DEA), has announced that the Danish wind power industry is beginning to get back into gear. Although Denmark is often regarded as one of the world’s leading exporters of wind power technology, the utilization of its expertise has slowed down in recent years.

    According to the DEA figures, onshore wind turbine capacity increased by 97 MW in 2009, which is the highest annual expansion since 2002. The Danish offshore capacity rose by 237 MW in 2009.

    We still have a long way to go
    The figures show that wind power provides around 20 percent of the total Danish electricity consumption – however, there is still a long way to go, in order to reach the goal of the Danish Wind Industry Association (DWIA). DWIA has a stated goal to reach 50 percent of consumption by 2020, which requires an annual onshore growth of approx. 160 MW.

    The DEA figures were welcomed by Jan Hylleberg, CEO of the Danish Wind Energy Association, who said in a statement that government programs offering incentives for turbine construction were now beginning to pay dividends. At the same time, he said, local municipalities were better able to define their role in turbine development after taking over responsibilities from regional governments.

    "There is reason to praise development in 2009” Hylleberg said. “It was a good year compared to recent years. But we can also see that there is a way to go to the average of 160 megawatts we need to ensure the long-term development of the wind turbine market”

    Read more
    For the full original article, see Børsen

  • 18 01 2010 | Denmark leads European offshore wind power in 2009

    Offshore wind turbines with a combined capacity of 577 MW were installed in Europe in 2009 and Denmark accounted for 230 MW of the expansion, the Danish Wind Industry...

    18 01 2010 Denmark leads European offshore wind power in 2009

    Offshore wind turbines with a combined capacity of 577 MW were installed in Europe in 2009 and Denmark accounted for 230 MW of the expansion, the Danish Wind Industry Association said today.

    Denmark-based wind-turbine maker Siemens Wind Power A/S and Vestas Wind Systems A/S accounted for a total 89.5% of the newly installed capacity in Europe.

    At the end of 2009, Denmark had installed a total 305 offshore wind turbines, capturing the first place in Europe, followed by the UK with 287 turbines.

    In addition to the already started offshore projects, there are approved plans for a further 16,000 MW new capacity in Europe. Germany accounts for some 52% of all future projects, while Denmark stands for 3%.

    "In order to retain its favourable position, the Danish wind turbine industry needs a political decision regarding the long-term goals for the expansion by 2020 as well as developed infrastructure," Jan Hylleberg, director of the Danish Wind Industry Association, said.

    The association expects the offshore market in Europe to grow by 75% on the year to some 1,000 MW in 2010 and to account for some 10% of the continent's total wind power capacity.

    Read the article at TradingMarkets.com

    Read the full EWEA report on Offshore development here (pdf)


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